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    Blown bulb damages module

    I have a problem I hope someone can help me with. I'm new to forums, so bare with me.

    I have two end table lamps in the living room, each with a 100w incandescent lamp. I originally had both lamps controlled by one 2457D2 lamp module. One of the bulbs burned out and after replacing the bulb the module no longer would turn the lamps on. The indicator lamp on the module showed the module responding to the hub but no power to the lamps. The total wattage of both lamps is 200w, below the 300w rating of the module.

    Thinking that maybe it was to close to the max rating of the module, I purchased two modules and split the lights, one 100w lamp on each module and changed the scene and everything worked. Now, the bulb in the other lamp has burned out and the module that it is plugged into no longer works. It shows responding to the hub but will not power the lamp. I checked everything but cannot see where anything else is wrong, the module of the other lamp is still functioning.

    Is this common? I would not think a bulb blowing out would blow out the module considering the load is at 1/3 the module rating.
    Can you help me, I can’t afford to replace a module every time a light bulb blows.

    Thanks,

    #2
    When an incandescent bulb "blows" it can present a direct short, especially a higher wattage bulb. That can pop the breaker and/or even burn out the contacts on a standard switch. Admittedly, it's somewhat unusual to happen twice, but possible.
    Message from Forum Admin: stusviews passed away in April 2018. Stu was a huge fan of Insteon and a huge presence on both the Smarthome and Insteon forums, helping thousands of us along the way (he had nearly 20,000 posts to his name). We thank him for his contributions, dedication, and passion for making the Smart Home a reality. He will truly be missed.
    Saving energy is not always free. Be a world saver.

    Comment


      #3
      A bulb blowing out can damage a dimmer module. Insteon is not unique in this issue. I have seen reports of X10 modules also failing when a bulb blows out.
      You may want to try a different brand bulb. The construction of some are more prone to shorting.

      Comment


        #4
        Since you just purchased these Insteon lamp lincs you're within the 2 year warranty period. Call customer service and ask for a RMA and they will send you a USPS paid postage label to send the unit back. Once they receive the damaged units they will ship out the new ones to you. If you don't want to wait you can ask for a *Cross Dock* they will ask for your CC and place a temporary debit amount on that card.

        At the same time they will send out the new units to you.

        You will at that time use the prepaid USPS label and ship back the broken units to Smarthome.
        Want to make a real difference? Please cast your vote to make the PLM Pro a reality: http://forum.insteon.com/forum/main-...t/8221-plm-pro

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you all for your help. If I understand correctly by the comments, this is not an unheard of problem. I am familiar with the potential inrush of a failing incandescent, but I assumed there would be some current limiting in the device to prevent this, as its original intended use is to control incandescent bulbs which do burn out. I have several standard dimmers in the house which have suffered blown bulbs over the years with no damage. I also have 2 rooms with Insteon in-wall dimming switches and I remember having to change one of the ceiling lights bulbs once. That switch was not damaged. Could this problem be limited to the plug in modules?
          BLH mentioned better constructed bulbs; are you familiar with a brand name I could try? I did contact Insteon and they are sending two modules under warranty; so I will try again and see if it was just my luck to get two bad ones.
          Thanks again for the help.

          Comment


            #6
            Glad to see you are going to get replacements. As you where using them within the specifications and proper type loads.
            I don't know if the 2457D2 has a fuse in its output. I know the older 2456D had one but it was in the AC input. Stress it too hard and the fuse blew and the module was completely dead
            I don' have any brands in mind and now that 100 watt bulbs are on our Baned Bulbs Lists. I see none in the stores. Just the acceptable 72 watt halogen replacements.
            Last edited by BLH; 12-25-2015, 04:13 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              I'm concerned that you've had two bulbs burn out in a short period of time. It's been ages since I've seen a bulb fail, the soft-start feature of the dimmers seems to protect them. Are any other electronics in the house blowing fuses, popping breakers, or showing signs that you may be getting surges?

              Comment


                #8
                Banned Bulb List? Hmmm. I know they are trying to phase out incandescent bulbs but I haven't heard of that, just purchased new ones at Home Depot to replace the spare one I used to replace the one that blew. They had plenty on the shelf. Maybe I should stock up. Tho that said, the 2457D2 specs only list it as compatible with incandescent loads but will they work with LEDs? If not is there a plug in module that will work with LEDs for when you do not have switched outlets? If the LEDs outlast me I won't have to worry about the modules being damaged.

                To TFitzpatri8: No, I have not had any issues with breakers tripping or indication of surges. I have a surge suppressor installed in the main panel which also gives indication of a surge. As to the short period of time, it was a span of a couple months. However, they were in two separate lamps and two different modules plugged into separate outlets. I also have had a the bulb in a ceiling light blow once with no damage to the in wall Insteon dimmer. I think the in wall dimmers are rated at 600 watts tho. I was planning to install more Dimmer modules in other locations in the house as most outlets are not switched. If this turns out to be an issue with the 2457D2 I'll need to re think it.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Well I was referring to the phase out. 100 watt ones should have been gone years ago. They do make a 72 watt Halogen acceptable replacement for the incandescent 100 watt ones and are 100% compatible with incandescent type dimmers. I use the 72 watt ones in an outside lights.
                  From what I have read. They gave no funding to the enforcement of the phase out and ones already produced by the cutoff date. Where still allowed to be sold.

                  Dimmable LED bulbs can be used with a 2457D2. Though exact bulb models may work well or poorly. So testing with a sample before a bulk purchase would be advisable and there are users here that may have information on model they have used.
                  Last edited by BLH; 12-29-2015, 02:37 PM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hi Tinkering,
                    from a 'Purest' point of view, incandescent bulbs are recommended to be mounted Base Up. This is to eliminate the potential of 'short circuits' when the filament fails. Potentially, if mounted Based Down, a failed filament could fall and short out across the filament support wires. Better quality lamps also have a 'fuse' inside the bulb. If you look at the glass mould where the filament support wires go through to the base, there should be a short length of slightly smaller wire inside this glass section. There will be two, one for each side of the lamp. These may 'blow' if there is a short caused by the filament.
                    If changing to LED's and using Leading edge dimmers, these should be de-rated by approx 80%. This is due to the Capacitors used in the Power Supply for the LED Drivers. They are connected Line to Neutral, so when initially powered up, they are seen as a very low impedance (high inrush current). Having said that, if a 15w LED is equivalent to a 100W incandescent, then you could install 3-4 LED's. I have had 3 *15W LED's on a 300W dimmer for about 18 months and had no issues. Also be aware that dimming LED's is not linear compared to incandescent and you may find that below 10% or so, the LED turns off regardless.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks, I think I'll give the LEDs a try, they produce less heat and would be cooler in table side lamps. How about compact florescent bulbs? Can they be used with the 2457D3?
                      I wasn't sure if ether would work with the dimmer module as the spec sheet for the 2457D2 only lists it compatible with Incandescent lamps.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Most dimmable LED and CFL bulbs work with Insteon dimmers. I've had success with Cree ans Sylvania LED bulbs. Philips bulbs flicker at settings less that 70%. Because manufacturing runs differ, you may get different results.
                        Message from Forum Admin: stusviews passed away in April 2018. Stu was a huge fan of Insteon and a huge presence on both the Smarthome and Insteon forums, helping thousands of us along the way (he had nearly 20,000 posts to his name). We thank him for his contributions, dedication, and passion for making the Smart Home a reality. He will truly be missed.
                        Saving energy is not always free. Be a world saver.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Most CFL's are not dimmable and will not work on a 2457D2.
                          If you look for CFL's. The packaging should say dimmable and not have a warning label they should not be used on a dimmer.

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