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  • General Communication Problems

    Hello. I'm having some interference issues with one of my 2466SW's. Here's my problem in a (large) nutshell. I have two 2466SW switches, let's call them A (front lights) and B (garage lights). I also have two 2653-222's plugged into outlets close to switch B. All of these devices are connected to my 2245-222 Hub. I have a normal overhead kitchen light fixture, C, that is not using any Insteon or other smart style switches. It is just using the old-school wall switches (it's a 3-way) that we all know. Now, whenever I have C on, I can no longer communicate with B through the Hub. All of my other Insteon devices work fine regardless of the state of C. But, when C is on, B will only work by physically moving the rocker switch. I also was not able to add B to the Hub while C was on. Originally, I didn't have any of the 2635-222s, but I added those after I started having this problem with B in hopes that they might help bridge the power line communication problem to RF, but that doesn't seem to be happening. When I try to add B to the Hub while C is on, I do hear the Hub make noises as if part of the communication is going through, but it's never successful until I turn off C. I have tried a factory reset of B with the 2635-222s in the system, but still nothing. Is there something else I could do to "force" the 2635-222s to act as a power line/RF bridge? Should I consider another device (range extender, real bridge, other) that I could add to the system that would fix this? Any help or suggestions would be great!

    Thanks!

  • #2
    What type of bulbs are in the kitchen fixture, incandescent, CFL, LED, other?
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    • #3
      They are definitely some sort of energy-reducing bulbs, but i'm not sure if they are CFL or LED. I just checked and there are three bulbs in there and they are all slightly different. One is the twisty style, one looks like an older style bulb on steroids (it gets larger immediately after the base) and the third looks like an old fashioned bulb, but it's definitely lower power.

      Thanks!

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      • #4
        UPDATE: So, when you mentioned the bulbs, I thought that was something I hadn't even thought about. So, I started removing them one by one and, low and behold, it was one bulb that was causing the interference!!! It was a Philips bulb, labeled as Marathon Mini Decorative Twister. So, with that bulb out and two other style Philips bulbs (soft white, 60W replacement uses 43W, A19 bulbs), all the communications seem to work as intended. I'm very excited! My next question is "should I avoid using the offending bulb anywhere in the house?" Or is there anything I could've done to prevent this?

        Thanks so much!

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        • #5
          I personally would not use it anywhere in the house.
          I don't think you could have done anything ahead of time to prevent this. Any CFL or LED bulb can be a problem but unless someone has reported a bulb as a problem. Only trial and error may find it.

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          • #6
            I have a couple of related questions on this topic...

            1. Is there yet a simple-to-use device that can:
            a.) Determine if there is noise in my electrical system?
            b.) Identify the offending device?

            2. Is there a list of the LED bulbs that cause noise/interference with communications between my Insteon devices and my ISY?

            I'm starting to replace my florescent bulbs and migrate to LED from incandescent bulbs. I currently have 5 florescent shop lights (14 tubes), 8 "150 watt" florescent screw-in bulbs, 10 "100 watt" LED bulbs, and 2 "60 watt" LED bulbs. So far I have no identified problems but sometimes wonder. I have noise/interference filters on all my UPS units and my power strips.

            Thanks,

            Steve

            [QUOTE=stusviews;n91511]What type of bulbs are in the kitchen fixture, incandescent, CFL, LED, other?[/QUOTE]

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            • #7
              1. The only way to find a noise maker is to disconnect devices until the offending device is found (just turning devices off is inadequate, they must be unplugged or disconnected). A systematic approach is best. Turn off breakers to find which circuit powers the problem device(s), then narrow it down by determining which device(s) lost power.

              2. There is no list. Even LED bulbs that have been employed successfully can change during the manufacturer's next run.
              Stu's Views is Education and Fun. What do YOU want to VIEW today?
              MathLandia High school mathematics learning fun.
              Both Stu's Views and MathLandia are free websites that do not sell anything.
              Saving energy is not always free. Be a world saver.

              Please don't PM with questions that can be asked in a forum.

              Comment


              • #8
                You might look at the diagnostic keypad to help identify noise...

                [url]https://youtu.be/fkqF_QEuVQg[/url]


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